Failure Is The Engine of the Economy

It struck me recently that the economy is actually built upon failures, as opposed to successes.

One would think that it was all the money generated by the huge successes that really powers everything. But really, the bulk of the results in business are failures — or more accurately, unsuccessful attempts. Most of the projects out there don’t succeed (or rather, result in a successful attempt). But there is money spent trying — people to hire, resources to purchase, advertising, support, design, manufacture, printing. And I’m sure there are plenty more industries involved that I am overlooking. But these “failures” far, far outweight the successes we actually hear about. And a lot of money was spent on those attempts.

This got me to wondering if this perspective is something that we can apply to our own businesses, own own “micro-economies”, to help us fuel a more successful version with the understanding of the collectively generative power of unsuccessful attempts. Continue reading “Failure Is The Engine of the Economy”

Psychological Stone Soup: A Recipe for Self-Development

When I get someone’s ear long enough to get up on a small soapbox and suggest an entry to the path of self-development, I always point to making the bed and washing the dishes. These habits are all about starting small. So small, if fact, that they might barely even be considered self-development. Let me explain why I think both are key habits to establish. Continue reading “Psychological Stone Soup: A Recipe for Self-Development”

Misdirected Enthusiasm

Enthusiasm is a strange thing. I never really paid much attention to it in the past — when it came, when it was gone. I always assumed enthusiasm was attached to specific projects, tasks and goals, and you were either in the mood or you weren’t. I’ve since changed my perspective on that.

Continue reading “Misdirected Enthusiasm”

Pursuing Passion

This post by David Seah brings up some interesting thoughts on the concept of pursuing your passions. He questions if he’s actually found his passion, and if so, why is it not flowing naturally? Seah mentions “The War of Art” which tells us—if Pressfield is correct in his theory—that it’s not going to be an easy road.

I’ve often wondered myself if I have misidentified what exactly my passion is. I’ve always assume that it is “art”, but what if it isn’t? You can’t get any more vague than just calling it “art”. Have I focused on the wrong niche?

Continue reading “Pursuing Passion”